MEET MANDY.

She’s the friend that tells it like it is, especially when it comes to the climate crisis. There’s no sugar coating or dressing things up – what you get from Mandy is good old fashioned truth – and I love it. Because as much as I believe in our ability to turn this thing around, if anything sows seeds of doubt, it’s our government’s response – and Mandy truly inspires me to hold them to account. If you’re interested in systemic change, Extinction Rebellion, and how you can help, brace yourself for a very real and honest chat!

Mandy, can you remember when you first heard about global warming?

I’ve always been interested in the natural world, with the oceans and their inhabitants being closest to my heart, and I’ve been aware of the impact that global warming is having on the coral and the life it sustains for a while. But I’ve only really understood what it means to us as humans in the last few years. 

You’ve recently become involved with Extinction Rebellion. How did this come about?

Their protests in April really struck a chord and whilst I appreciate their methods aren’t to everyone’s taste, I think they – and others – have done so much this year to highlight the peril we’re in. I began by joining a few marches and actions, and as I’ve grown familiar with how they operate, I’ve become interested in doing more.

Do you think we’re making progress in addressing the climate crisis?

No, I don’t. Whilst most governments seem to recognise there’s a climate emergency, a lot of the rhetoric around the subject focuses on how we as individuals can change. It’s true there’s lots we can do, but switching energy suppliers, not flying and buying bamboo toothbrushes aren’t enough to fix our dependence on fossil fuels and halt the rate at which our actions are killing animals worldwide. There has to be a major shift in how we human beings live on this earth – and this requires huge, swift systemic change. Governments need to act at a level they’re nowhere near close to at the moment.

How do you respond to climate change denial?

Not well!  Most people seem to believe in antibiotics, gravity, the earth being round etc, but for some reason not all of them believe in the climate emergency – even though scientist after scientist is lining up with overwhelming evidence. It makes no sense to me at all!

I think a lot of us struggle with the idea of moving away from our consumer-based lifestyles and giving up comforts we’ve become accustomed to. I’m definitely finding it a challenge to make do with less, especially as we come up to Christmas. But accepting we all have a role in this is so important and empowering, no matter how small.

With that said, I’m not aware of anyone in my personal life disagreeing with the science. More often it’s something I encounter on TV – and I respond to it in this context by shouting at the telly!

Who inspires you most in the climate movement? What have you learned from them?

Everyone who fights for the environment in some way inspires me, but it’s the children who are standing up for our planet I admire the most. Our kids have inherited the most awful knowledge and the way they’re telling us adults that it’s not ok is incredibly inspiring. From the prominent Greta Thunburg to the lesser known individuals I’ve met at actions – and my own son – they truly are changing the world and teaching me one person really can make a difference.

What else motivates you to keep going?

My future, my children’s future and the knowledge that humans are hugely adaptable.

What advice would you give somebody thinking about campaigning for the first time?

I’m honestly not sure I’m experienced enough to give advice on this. However, I will say, if you’re feeling helpless in the face of this crisis, the best antidote is to act in some way – whether that be campaigning, changing your spending habits or something else, just act.

Thanks Mandy, I couldn’t support this antidote more!

Check out Extinction Rebellion at rebellion.earth

MEET MANDY.

She’s the friend that tells it like it is, especially when it comes to the climate crisis. There’s no sugar coating or dressing things up – what you get from Mandy is good old fashioned truth – and I love it. Because as much as I believe in our ability to turn this thing around, if anything sows seeds of doubt, it’s our government’s response – and Mandy truly inspires me to hold them to account. If you’re interested in systemic change, Extinction Rebellion, and how you can help, brace yourself for a very real and honest chat!

Mandy, can you remember when you first heard about global warming?

I’ve always been interested in the natural world, with the oceans and their inhabitants being closest to my heart, and I’ve been aware of the impact that global warming is having on the coral and the life it sustains for a while. But I’ve only really understood what it means to us as humans in the last few years. 

You’ve recently become involved with Extinction Rebellion. How did this come about?

Their protests in April really struck a chord and whilst I appreciate their methods aren’t to everyone’s taste, I think they – and others – have done so much this year to highlight the peril we’re in. I began by joining a few marches and actions, and as I’ve grown familiar with how they operate, I’ve become interested in doing more.

Do you think we’re making progress in addressing the climate crisis?

No, I don’t. Whilst most governments seem to recognise there’s a climate emergency, a lot of the rhetoric around the subject focuses on how we as individuals can change. It’s true there’s lots we can do, but switching energy suppliers, not flying and buying bamboo toothbrushes aren’t enough to fix our dependence on fossil fuels and halt the rate at which our actions are killing animals worldwide. There has to be a major shift in how we human beings live on this earth – and this requires huge, swift systemic change. Governments need to act at a level they’re nowhere near close to at the moment.

How do you respond to climate change denial?

Not well!  Most people seem to believe in antibiotics, gravity, the earth being round etc, but for some reason not all of them believe in the climate emergency – even though scientist after scientist is lining up with overwhelming evidence. It makes no sense to me at all!

I think a lot of us struggle with the idea of moving away from our consumer-based lifestyles and giving up comforts we’ve become accustomed to. I’m definitely finding it a challenge to make do with less, especially as we come up to Christmas. But accepting we all have a role in this is so important and empowering, no matter how small.

With that said, I’m not aware of anyone in my personal life disagreeing with the science. More often it’s something I encounter on TV – and I respond to it in this context by shouting at the telly!

Who inspires you most in the climate movement? What have you learned from them?

Everyone who fights for the environment in some way inspires me, but it’s the children who are standing up for our planet I admire the most. Our kids have inherited the most awful knowledge and the way they’re telling us adults that it’s not ok is incredibly inspiring. From the prominent Greta Thunburg to the lesser known individuals I’ve met at actions – and my own son – they truly are changing the world and teaching me one person really can make a difference.

What else motivates you to keep going?

My future, my children’s future and the knowledge that humans are hugely adaptable.

What advice would you give somebody thinking about campaigning for the first time?

I’m honestly not sure I’m experienced enough to give advice on this. However, I will say, if you’re feeling helpless in the face of this crisis, the best antidote is to act in some way – whether that be campaigning, changing your spending habits or something else, just act.

Thanks Mandy, I couldn’t support this antidote more!

Check out Extinction Rebellion at rebellion.earth